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Andy Force interviews Sourone ahead of his UK debut at the Zenon Records Special

Reported by Andy Force / Submitted 11-10-15 23:04

The musical philosophy of some artists suggests that the route to success is the path of adaptation and acquiescence to the fads and fashions which circulate the music scene, in the hope that the popular wave they ride will take them to new heights. Counterposed to this are those to whom the pure expression of musical instinct cannot be compromised, and whose creative art is brought into this world for its own sake. These innovators and originators are the life-blood of the scene; their ideas are the ones which stimulate the growth of new techniques, styles, methods and even genres. These creators often sit on the margins until the world is ready for their arrival, instead of making themselves fit into the pre-existing paradigms of the musical world.

One such artist is Sourone. Only 29, Michal Kalinowski from Poland demonstrates prodigious musical production abilities, adept in delivering a breadth of styles including psychedelic progressive, glitch, ambient, IDM and much in between. His music is incessantly original, unashamedly unique, and relentlessly pushes forward the farthest boundaries of the psychedelic sound.

Sourone appears in London for his UK debut on the 17th October for the Zenon Records Special at a secret location in London. We caught up with him before his big introduction to the UK scene.



Your sound is very unique, even when considered alongside similar artists in your genre. How did you evolve to have such an individual sound, and where have your key influences come from?

I always enjoyed listening to various kinds of music and not necessarily electronic music. I had a lot of luck to get to know some experimental and progressive rock in my childhood, which had a huge impact on my musical perception nowadays. The biggest influence was brought to me by Tool’s music and also less known, Can.

In electronic music, I love it when it sounds fresh and wakes the natural need of discovery – that’s what inspires me the most. Also there’s too many awesome artists there to mention at once in this interview tbh. I am a big fan of anime, especially of the cyberpunk style – Japanese animation is a really big inspiration for me.

Your style seems completely opposite to the mainstream psychedelic sound, with its tangential riffs and unpredictable twists and turns. Why do you like making music which is this underground? Couldn’t you make more money by producing a more accessible or popular style of psy trance?

The main factor that drives me to create – it’s fun and inventive. And the most fun I have, is with experimenting with new, sometimes weird things, not necessarily compatible with a wider audience. I am not listening too much mainstream psy trance also, but I have big respect for the producers in this area, because this music is so damn well produced. But still... it’s not what I’m looking for as a listener and as a producer, even despite the aspect of money.





You make a lot of different styles of psychedelic music! Please tell us about your different projects… what are the differences and similarities between projects?

I used to write glitch and idm music under the name Enoruos which is obviously Sourone reversed, but I decided to stop using that name and stick to one brand. So basically by this artist name I have a couple of paths I took. I love writing melodies and mixing them with glitchy worlds in down- and mid-tempo, as well as experimenting with progressive psychedelia. Differences in a psy project and an idm project can be obvious by the form, tempo, mood etc. but I think the listener still can feel this ‘element’ that connects the styles.

What is the key to your creativity?

I am not sure if there’s one key. I think there’s a whole bunch of things that boosts the creativity. In my case, it’s experiencing art at festivals and spending time with people from the scene. Exchanging ideas and also listening to different styles of music from which I am trying to grasp what I find inspiring – from these I get very good creative stimulation. And also good coffee works well.



Your progressive style is known for its unique ‘micro-squelch’, is this particular sound your own invention?

Mother nature has invented it a long ago, and some amphibians use these kind of sounds all the time. So I am not actually an inventor, but surely I have digitalised them and mutated on a micro level. My idea is to make something organic melting with cybernetic.

Your biography talks about your music having two poles, a light side and a dark side, that balance each other out. Can you please tell us a bit more about this? Is it something you’re conscious of in the studio?

Yes, that’s my conception of creating music and a kind of way also. The part I consider darker is psy/progressive and the light side is chilled idm and glitch pieces. When I get stuck at some point with, for example, proggy material, I use glitch music to refresh the ideas and look at things from a new way. I see it as a globe, with two poles. I go from north to south and reverse to keep my ideas as fresh as possible and to avoid routine.





What is your favourite memory or experience from travelling the world with your music?

It’s difficult to find in my head the one which I could mark as a favourite. I’ve had the pleasure to experience rrrrreally awesome events and gatherings with a very unique spirit of their own. They imbued me significantly.

But the most intense and moving travel was Boom Festival 2014. Also it was my first time there, so I was like "WOW". It was so big and amazing... I was there a couple of days and I’m pretty sure I didn’t check out all the places.

‘Artificial Transcendence’ is an incredible piece of music, did it take you long to produce?

Thanks a lot man. I am very glad you enjoyed this piece. I like it too, and I really liked making this track. It was a lot of work... multiple layers of percussion, synths, tons of cutting and stuff, playing with quick tempo changes at some part. I wanted to make it very groovy and dancefloorish, yet also for home listening – to chill. It took me over one and a half months to fully finish it, in around 10 sessions. So I made some parts, waited a bit to get some ideas and then developed the next part etc.



You’re making your UK live debut at the Zenon Records Special next Friday 17th October, alongside Electrypnose, Hellquest, Triptaktik, Millivolt and many more. Are you excited?

I am stoked as hell haha... seriously – this is such a damn awesome opportunity to meet and hangout with you guys. There is going to be a very huge load of amazing dancefloor music from really awesome people. I feel really proud to take part in this.

Also it will be my first time in UK and my debut set there as well – I can’t be more excited. I can’t wait to play my set for a London crowd!



Links
Sourone on FaceBook
Sourone on Soundcloud
Sourone artist page
Embrace the Random EP

Sourone is making his UK debut at the Zenon Records Special on Saturday 17 October. Join the FaceBook event page for info and updates.

Images courtesy of Sourone and Zenon Records. Not to be reproduced without permission.
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Other Features By Andy Force:
Lifeforms detected at Astral Circus!
Dare to be different: Tribal Village meets Suduaya
Keeping moving with Mechanimal!
Land Switcher – The Earth is Moving at Tribal Village
Sensient climbs to new heights: The Way Of The Sloth album launch party hits London
The views and opinions expressed in this review are strictly those of the author only for which HarderFaster will not be held responsible or liable.
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